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This is a tool that functions like a mail merge. You can set it a rubric in a google form, and the results will publish to a Google Sheet. You can then set up mail merge fields in a Google Doc feedback report to students. You can set it up so that once you complete the form rubric it automatically emails the report to students.

This tool allows you to create and share screen and webcam recordings.

The Tapestry Segmentation from ESRI divides the US population into 67 different “market segments” - that is, groups of people who make about the same amount of money, live similar lifestyles, and have common preferences. This enormously rich set of data can be used to better understand communities around the country.

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Manifest Destiny was an idea first articulated in 1845 and popular in the United States during the early part of the 19th century.  This doctrine expressed the belief that the expansion of the United States throughout the Americas was inevitable and justified - by God according to some.

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A map of Washington DC was created in 1851 - a time of relative peace in the United States. Millard Fillmore was president, California had just become a state, and the Capitol building was undergoing an expansion project to accommodate the nation’s growing size.

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There are many different ways to precisely measure the quality of water in a river. Environmental scientists and volunteers all over the state of Michigan are continuously collecting measurements of the quality of water in rivers, streams, and lakes. Students will look at two of these measures to see how they change with location around the state and along a river.

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As a society, we use land in many different ways. The way we use land has a tremendous impact on how water flows over and through land as it makes it way to streams, rivers, and the Great Lakes. When rainwater falls on land, it gradually makes its way downhill. In developed areas, including both farms and urban areas, there is much less vegetation to slow the water down.

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Rivers are incredibly important to our society and our environment, but we haven’t always treated our rivers as well as we should. By using pictures taken from satellites orbiting the earth, we can examine rivers all over Michigan and try to identify those rivers that appear to have higher water quality and those that appear to have lower quality.

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As rain falls all over Michigan, the water gathers in small local watersheds, which feed into larger regional watersheds, which ultimately feed into the Great Lakes. Water that falls on the land in Michigan eventually flows into one of the Great Lakes because the elevation of the Great Lakes is generally lower than the elevation of the land in Michigan.

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This lesson focuses on the use of elevation maps with a focus on Michigan’s Muskegon River Watershed. Students are introduced to an elevation profile tool and expected to produce a profile of two other Michigan rivers and examine their watersheds.

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