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Dear LOR user,

Thank you for being a big part of this community. To better support the initiatives around open educational resources in the state of Michigan, all resources on the Michigan Virtual Learning Object Repository (LOR) are being moved to #GoOpen Michigan on September 30th, 2018. During the transition, our LOR will be moved to an archived state, not allowing new user registration or new content to be added. An email with more details was sent to registered users of the LOR in September. To make use of the great resources on the platform, we encourage you to create an account and add your own new resources to the #GoOpen Michigan platform.

Resources

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This exercise allows your students to understand why in America so many people don't vote and an opportunity to brainstorm how to get more participation. You will have your students brainstorm with a partner all the reasons that people in America don't vote and write them down in a shared google doc. Are any of them valid reasons? What is your view as a citizen on voting?

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Students will get an overview of the efforts of women to gain suffrage in America and then will compare the Declaration of Independence with the Seneca Falls Declaration of 1848 by Elizabeth Stanton. The lesson will conclude with the students submitting their comparison and a brief declaration of their own demanding women's suffrage.

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This is a student project to illustrate stages of expansion of voting rights.

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This will be a culminating project for your students to show political party impact by decade.

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This object will be a discussion board posting to use with political influences.

Directions to students: Your group will be assigned one of the influencers below. On a whiteboard or discussion board write down all the ways you could be influenced and form opinions on important topics, such as political party support. Be as specific as possible and be ready to share with the class.

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Students will culminate the unit on political parties with a debate on whether America should continue on with a two-party system or move to a multi-party system. To incorporate technology and an international aspect to the debate you will be participating with a classroom from Canada via Skype, a country that has a multi-party system.

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This object with get your students familiar with the party leadership structure within both houses of congress.

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As part of the unit on political parties the students will compare and contrast the two main parties, the Democrats, and the Republicans.

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The lesson focuses on the ability of the students to form a list of political policy stances that would be considered liberal or conservative and then compare that to a list of what was considered liberal political ideas or conservative political ideas around the early 1900's.

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This object is designed to get your students to understand the role of the minor parties in a two-party system. America is known as a "Two-Party System", however there are some Third Parties or Minor Parties that do exist. The role of the Minor Party is much different than the role of the two main parties in American politics.

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